California Lawyers Association (CLA) Conference

General News & Firm Announcements   |   Tuesday, September 25, 2018

On September 14 and 15, 2018, Ginny Sanderson attended the California Lawyers Association (CLA) Annual Meeting in San Diego, California in her capacity as outgoing co-chair of the Internet Law and Privacy Committee. In 2018, the Sections and Committees of the State Bar of California formally separated from that organization and, together with the California Young Lawyers Association, formed the new CLA.  Thus, although the conference marked the 87th meeting of the Sections and Committees, it was also the inaugural Annual Meeting of the CLA.  Over 600 attorneys from all practice areas were in attendance to weigh in on the future of the CLA and attend CLE Programs.

Both Ginny and Karl Kronenberger have served on the Internet and Privacy Law Committee (IPLC), which was formerly known as the Cyberspace Law Committee. Each month, the IPLC hosts free CLE programs in conjunction with its monthly meetings. This year, it co-sponsored several events related to Internet and Privacy Law, including the original Content Moderation at Scale conference hosted by the High Tech Law Institute at Santa Clara University Law School in February 2018. The IPLC has also co-authored letters to the California legislature regarding proposed and current amendments to key statutes, including California’s Anti-Spam Law and the California Consumer Privacy Act (CaCPA), which goes into effect on January 1, 2020

This entry was posted on Tuesday, September 25, 2018 and is filed under Ginny Sanderson, Internet Law News.




Practice Alehemy
karl




Related articles

False Advertising and Defamation
InsideCounsel Features Karl Kronenberger on Consequences of Employees…

InsideCounsel called upon Karl Kronenberger in the article, “Can employees comment about their employer on social media sites?” to discuss the legal implications of an…

Read More

Trademarks Copyrights and Trade Secrets
Monkey Selfies, AI, and Copyright (or, Do Androids…

Who owns photos taken by monkeys today? Tomorrow, who will own photos taken by autonomous drones, or written works produced by machine learning algorithms or…

Read More